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2 days ago by tomcam

Bought it based on the feature matrix, which is worth $15 for honesty\comedic value alone. Probably no time actually to use it

2 days ago by onionisafruit

> Probably no time actually to use it

That describes every music related purchase I’ve made in the past 20 years. I’m glad I’ve done a small part to support some creative people, but aside from that I’ve got a bunch of pedals I’ve used once.

a day ago by raffraffraff

Haha. I love that. Fuck it I'm gonna buy it too!

I played piano for 9 years as a child, and then stopped when I went to college (because no piano). But I taught myself to play guitar in (boredom + found guitar and music know-how). But I'm in my mid 40s now and have done very little musically in 20 years. I really really really want to play more music, but I'll probably end up saying that on my deathbed (in past tense). Maybe downloading this thing and plugging a guitar or piano up to a computer will change that.

2 days ago by Lucasoato

I'm a software developer right now but I've worked with DAWs as a producer for more than 5 years. You can't even imagine how frustrating is working with Digital Audio Workstation. One messy plug-in and you can lose hours and hours of work. Preset management is a nightmare, there are so many things that they could do to go forward, but the Sequencer market is stall and hasn't moved in years.

Imagine if they applied something similar to a git versioning system to music projects.... I don't even know if the VST interface can be used or if it's licensed somehow from Steinberg.

Also consider that there are no good audio drivers for Linux (like Asio for example) so you're almost forced to stay in windows or Mac...

No plug-in or DAW has a CLI... I could go on for hours...

I'm doing some digital audio processing for a startup idea and the only thing I've came up with is using sox trough a Python API.

2 days ago by PaulDavisThe1st

> Also consider that there are no good audio drivers for Linux (like Asio for example) so you're almost forced to stay in windows or Mac...

This is false.

> Imagine if they applied something similar to a git versioning system to music projects.

People have done this. Using git itself is a little problematic because it is very line-oriented and most project file formats for DAWs are not.

Regarding plugins, I know that I'm not the only lead developer of a DAW who, if they possibly could, would refuse to support plugins entirely. The problem is that most users want more functionality than a DAW itself could feasibly provide (they also sometimes like to use the same functionality (plugin) in different DAWs or different workflows).

There are things close to DAW functionality that have a CLI (such as ecasound). You can also run plugins from the command line by using standalone plugin hosts. You can use oscsend(1) to control plugins inside several different plugin hosts.

It sounds to me as if you've worked with a relatively small number of DAWs on only Windows and macOS and are not really aware of the breadth or depth of the "field".

2 days ago by dewert

> > Also consider that there are no good audio drivers for Linux (like Asio for example) so you're almost forced to stay in windows or Mac...

> This is false.

This was my immediate thought as well. Not sure what level we're talking here, so sorry if I'm addressing the wrong part of the stack, but JACK on Linux has been a great experience for me in terms of latency and ease of use. I run into way more day-to-day problems on Windows.

What feature specifically are you missing on Linux?

Re: plugins, DAWs with VST sandboxing are great. I use Bitwig, and I've never lost work due to a plugin crash.

a day ago by hammyhavoc

PipeWire is love. PipeWire is life. Doing post on a documentary whilst using PipeWire. Linux for audio is finally there.

2 days ago by noahadavis

And now that we have PipeWire, getting low latency audio is extremely easy too.

21 hours ago by officeplant

>Re: plugins, DAWs with VST sandboxing are great. I use Bitwig, and I've never lost work due to a plugin crash.

Exactly, the original thread reads as someone who hasn't touched a modern DAW from the last 8 years or so. Even Renoise has multicore support with sandboxed plugins so one of my ancient free shitty vsts doesn't bring down the whole system.

2 days ago by stevefolta

> Using git itself is a little problematic because it is very line-oriented and most project file formats for DAWs are not.

Ardour and Reaper use plaintext project formats that work well with Git, at least for basic versioning.

> Regarding plugins, I know that I'm not the only lead developer of a DAW who, if they possibly could, would refuse to support plugins entirely. The problem is that most users want more functionality than a DAW itself could feasibly provide (they also sometimes like to use the same functionality (plugin) in different DAWs or different workflows).

I think the answer to this would be something like Reaper's "JS" plugins, which are written in a small compiled language and distributed as source code. Compared to "JS", it would need to: 1) be open source; 2) be a better language; and 3) support pretty skeuomorphic graphics ('cause people seem to really want that in their plugins). Ardour seems to be working on something like this using Lua (don't know about the graphics, or if the plugins could be supported in other DAWs).

2 days ago by PaulDavisThe1st

Ardour uses XML for its session format, which is not a line-oriented format. Git can handle it, most of the time, but is not ideal. Something that groks the concept of XML nodes would do a better job (i.e. less conflicts duing merge resolution).

Ardour comes with a small set of basic "curated" plugins written in C or C++, that are "blessed" by us. Writing DSP plugins in Lua is also possible, but generally discouraged and, as you guessed, you can't provide a dedicated GUI for them, nor can they be used elsewhere (same limitation as Reaper's Jesusonic plugins).

However, even if those details were improved, the idea that a DAW manufacturer is going to be able to supply the precise EQ that demanding users want, let alone noise reduction, polyphonic pitch correction, and so, so much more, strikes me as unrealistc.

2 days ago by tomc1985

> Regarding plugins, I know that I'm not the only lead developer of a DAW who, if they possibly could, would refuse to support plugins entirely. The problem is that most users want more functionality than a DAW itself could feasibly provide (they also sometimes like to use the same functionality (plugin) in different DAWs or different workflows).

Honestly the sound quality of most DAWs' built-in effects and synths are garbage. Even the effects section of most VST synths is bad! Best to allow plugins rather than trying to reinvent the wheel; you'll have to pry my beloved serum/iZotope/u-he/softube plugins out of my cold dead hands

Also, the "sometimes" is an understatement. Anyone who's been doing this a while likely to be pretty invested in the plugins they have. I would say the majority of working musicians that use DAWs work this way

2 days ago by lavabiopsy

I think you are misinterpreting that comment, I believe the idea there would be to have built-in functionality that would be equal or surpassing to those plugins, possibly by merging the actual plugins with the DAW. Of course doing that in a way that will please everyone is a lot harder to do than it sounds and is likely not even feasible, but the supposed benefit would be that the DAW could better integrate that functionality and would not have to deal with a lot of the reliability issues that exist with plugins. (Disclaimer: I agree with the GP comment in the sense that dropping plugins from DAWs would be a great thing to do if it were at all possible, but it currently really isn't)

21 hours ago by officeplant

>Honestly the sound quality of most DAWs' built-in effects and synths are garbage.

Have you ever tried Reason? Then again I'm actually using Reason as a plugin (via vst3 to vst2 wrapper) so I can sequence it easily with renoise. Because why not just load a DAW in your DAW.

2 days ago by wwweston

> This is false.

Suffice it to say that it's non-obvious to me where to start to go about getting a stable and mobile (ie laptop) experience. I'd like nothing better than to receive a response that makes me feel sheepish for thinking that Linux is the problem, and if anyone can give out good pointers I'd imagine you can.

2 days ago by PaulDavisThe1st

Well, first of all let's start with noting that hardware can prevent you from ever getting a stable response. Some explanatory background on that here:

https://manual.ardour.org/setting-up-your-system/the-right-c...

On Linux you do not (as a rule) install device drivers for your devices. They come with the system or they (generally) don't exist. I know of only one audio interface manufacturer who ever maintained their own drivers outside of the kernel tree (i.e. not part of mainstream Linux) and even they have had their drivers integrated now.

Next, since you're on a laptop, you're relieved of the unenviable task of figuring out whether to use a PCI(.) bus device or a USB interface. USB is your only option. The good news here is that any USB audio interface that works with an iPad also works on Linux. Why? Because iPad doesn't allow driver installs, and so manufacturers have been forced to make sure their devices work with a generic USB audio class device driver, just like they need to do on Linux. With very few exceptions, you can more or less buy any contemporary USB audio interface these days, just plug it into your Linux laptop (or desktop or whatever), and it will work.

What can be an issue is a lack of ability to configure the internals of the device. Some manufacturers e.g. MOTU have taken the delightful step of doing this by putting an http server on the device, and thus allowing you to configure it from any browser on anything at all. Others have used just generic USB audio class features, allowing it to be controlled from the basic Linux utilities for this sort of thing. And still more continue to only provide Windows/macOS-native configuration utilities. For some devices, dedicated Linux equivalents exist. Best place to check on that would be to start at linuxmusicians.com and use their forums.

Beyond the hardware, it's hard to give more advice because it depends on the experience/workflow you want to use. If you're looking for something Ableton Live-like, Bitwig is likely your best option. If you want a more traditional linear timeline-y DAW ala ProTools, Logic etc., then Reaper, Ardour or Mixbus would probably be good choices. If you want to do software modular, VCV Rack is head and shoulders above anything else (and runs on other platforms too).

There's a very large suite of LV2 plugins on Linux. Stay away from CALF even though they look pretty. The others range from functional to excellent. Your rating will depend on your workflow and aesthetics. You will not find libre plugins that do what deeply-DSP-oriented proprietary plugins do (e.g. Izotope, Melodyne), though you may be satisfied with things in the same ballpark (e.g. Noise Repellent and AutoTalent).

There's a growing body of VST3 plugins for Linux. If you're looking for amazing (non-libre) synths, U-he has all (?) their products available in a perpetual beta for Linux. Great stuff. There are plenty of libre synths too. There's an LV2 version of Vital called Vitalium which is more stable than the VST3 version; this synth has had rave reviews from many different reviewers.

Sample libraries are a problem because most of them are created for Kontakt. You have a choice of running Kontakt inside a Windows VST adapter (e.g. yabridge) or using other formats such as SFZ or DecentSampler, both of which have both free and libre players. pianobook.co.uk has hundreds of somewhat interesting sample libraries, many (but definitely not even most) of them available in DS format.

Hope this helps.

2 days ago by supernintendo

> Also consider that there are no good audio drivers for Linux (like Asio for example) so you're almost forced to stay in windows or Mac...

ASIO, really? Sorry but you couldn’t pay me to go back to that broken piece of crap after switching to Linux and JACK2. I’m actually traumatized by that piece of software, thinking of moments where ASIO would just break and cause my Live session to collapse into a glitchy cacophony of latency-induced noise. I’ve seen this happen on several computers with different Windows installations and external audio hardware and the problem always ends up being ASIO. Some of the producers I knew swore off anything that wasn’t a Mac because of this exact problem.

The problem with audio production on Linux in 2021 isn’t the audio protocol. It’s that most free and open source audio production software for Linux is dreadful to use. UX is actually very important for DAWs. I want to like Ardour but it’s a miserable piece of software to try to make music in. Feels like a chore to perform any action, kills my vibe, would not recommend. After trying really hard to become comfortable using it, I finally gave up and bought Bitwig. It’s a proprietary DAW and kinda expensive but I’ve been producing music with it for a couple of years and it’s a dream to use - sort of a spiritual successor to Ableton IMO.

> No plug-in or DAW has a CLI…

Most people who make music don’t care about this. I’m a software developer and musician who only uses Linux and I don’t care about this. In my opinion, Linux developers of free and open source creative software should spend less time building these features for other developers and focus more on making their software feel good to create with. If I feel bad trying to use your clunky-ass UI to make my art / music / whatever then I’m not going to hold myself back because it has a free software license. I’m going to find a piece of software that gets out of the way and lets me make what I want to make.

2 days ago by PaulDavisThe1st

> I want to like Ardour but it’s a miserable piece of software to try to make music in. Feels like a chore to perform any action, kills my vibe, would not recommend. After trying really hard to become comfortable using it, I finally gave up and bought Bitwig. It’s a proprietary DAW and kinda expensive but I’ve been producing music with it for a couple of years and it’s a dream to use - sort of a spiritual successor to Ableton IMO.

As I've mentioned above, I get all kinds of email about Ardour, some declaring their love for it, and some much more condemnatory than anything you've said here.

The point is that "trying to make music" isn't much of a description: people's workflows for "making music" vary dramatically. Not many years ago, more or less the only way to do this was to record yourself playing one or more instruments and/or singing. These days, there are many fundamentally different workflows, and countless minor variations of each one. If Bitwig works for you, it's no surprise that Ardour doesn't. There's a bunch of people for whom the opposite is true. You have to be prepared to try different tools and figure out which ones work for you.

Finally, ASIO and JACK don't really at the same level. JACK on Windows actually uses ASIO. The comparison to ASIO on Linux is ALSA, and sure, I'd agree that it's better than ASIO is most ways (though maybe not 100%).

2 days ago by supernintendo

> The point is that "trying to make music" isn't much of a description: people's workflows for "making music" vary dramatically. Not many years ago, more or less the only way to do this was to record yourself playing one or more instruments and/or singing. These days, there are many fundamentally different workflows, and countless minor variations of each one.

Excellent point and apologies if that comment came across as inflammatory. I really respect the work you and the Ardour team have done even if it's not for me (and infinite thanks for your work on JACK, it truly is a special piece of software). My frustration has more to do with there not being a FOSS DAW that gives me that true Ableton-like experience. I understand why though, this stuff is hard to build and one workflow does not fit all as you point out.

2 days ago by jefftk

>> No plug-in or DAW has a CLI

> I’m a software developer and musician who only uses Linux and I don’t care about this.

I am a software developer and musician who uses Linux and I do care about this. I run headless, and control my audio software through custom logic and hardware while playing live. I ended up writing a custom synthesizer and see because I couldn't find anything that works well for my use case

(I'm still open to something else; my synth doesn't sound very good. Designing custom sounds is not something I'm great at or something where I really want to focus.)

2 days ago by PaulDavisThe1st

You can run Ardour headless and control it 100% using OSC (from the command line, with oscsend, or from a touch device (phone/tablet) using eg. TouchOSC). You could also get significant but not as extensive control using MIDI.

2 days ago by supernintendo

> I am a software developer and musician who uses Linux and I do care about this. I run headless, and control my audio software through custom logic and hardware while playing live. I ended up writing a custom synthesizer and see because I couldn't find anything that works well for my use case

That's pretty cool. Most modern DAWs allow you to define per-controller triggers for custom logic in the form of MIDI events. I guess you could write a CLI that maps custom commands to MIDI events and allows you to send those events to your DAW when they are called. It's not exactly what you're describing (and maybe it doesn't fit your use case) but is that something you've considered?

2 days ago by nprateem

There will always be tinkerers who write their own synths. Everyone else just uses serum or whatever and makes music.

a day ago by stinos

ASIO, really?

Havng had zero problems with this (already many years ago, in the days where getting low latency on linux was extremely hard) on a variety of machines but all with pretty decent cards is it possible that the problem has nothing to do with ASIO but rather with crappy drivers / manufacturers? Or perhaps you just had bad luck?

2 days ago by sasaf5

JACK2? Sorry my ignorance, it's been a while I abandoned Linux audio for Ableton on Windows with a focusrite Scarlet. Did they solve that JACK/alsa problem? Without running a2j in the background?

2 days ago by lavabiopsy

Which problem are you referring to? a2jmidi should work fine as long as you have access to the device. But in any case that should not be necessary anymore if you use pipewire, which should be able to manage all the devices at once.

2 days ago by supernintendo

I don't run a2j or even have it installed so in my case it doesn't seem to be a problem. My audio production setup isn't highly complex FWIW but with the following configuration I have had no issues with audio or MIDI input and output. All of my devices are just plug-and-play for both Bitwig and qjackctl:

- Distro: Arch Linux

- Audio backend: JACK2 and PipeWire

- USB Audio Interface: Behringer U-Phoria UMC404HD

- USB controllers: Akai APC 40 mkii, Casio CTK-6200

- Microphone: Zoom H6

I run this exact setup on my Ryzen desktop and a Thinkpad T480 with no problems. I've also tried routing the audio output of various software directly into my DAW using qjackctl, works perfectly fine.

2 days ago by rudenoise

Things to check:

For audio on linux: https://pipewire.org/

For a more code oriented audio workflow (python lib to load VST and AU) https://github.com/spotify/pedalboard

2 days ago by PaulDavisThe1st

Pipewire is a layer above most of the really important stuff.

Pedalboard is also not a realtime audio environment (as was clarified by one of its developers here on the HN thread last week). In that sense it is extremely different from Bespoke (and nearly everything else).

a day ago by pandakar

For you pythonheads, please check out Olivier's wonderful pyo https://github.com/belangeo/pyo

2 days ago by Lucasoato

I'll never thank you enough for linking pedalboard... That's exactly what I've always needed lol

2 days ago by gregsadetsky

It was posted here less than a week ago too!

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=28458930

2 days ago by xbpx

Since you're a software dev you may have explored supercollider and other environments where you can employ great tools. I've been looking for a hybrid UI/UX + Audio programming environment that would combine the freedom of code with the visual cues of a DAW but haven't found the ideal fit. So far I've been rolling my own with cl-collider, a common lisp client for Supercollider which uses some lisp tricks (macros) to good effect.

2 days ago by fivre

damn, the audio wave visualization on the wires in the thing that's like the Bitwig grid editor is just BRILLIANT.

probably would be a bit much in a complex finished instrument but that's amazingly intuitive for the building phase, or for reading someone else's instrument.

i wish there a way to translate old Reaktor library stuff into more modern synth GUIs. there's some amazing gold in there but it is nigh impossible to understand between Reaktor's uh... challenging UI and the total lack of documentation for the signal paths to try and explain them to a relative novice. you can very easily see _what's_ built, but god help you try to understand why on your own without adding a ton of scopes everywhere manually

2 days ago by mortenjorck

The oscilloscope-as-wire idea is one of those rare ideas that seems obvious in hindsight, yet no one (to my knowledge) has done it before, at least in a box-and-pin UI.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see it start popping up elsewhere, similar to how Ableton made everyone realize they had somehow been living without retrospective MIDI capture.

2 days ago by awwbees

hey! I'm the guy who developed bespoke. I too thought that the waveform-in-wire thing was original, but a few years after I put it in, I realized that I had subconsciously stolen it from ReacTable. there's nothing new under the sun, everything is a remix!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mgy1S8qymx0

2 days ago by ioseph

Not quite the same but I love the way the ports in VCV Rack are LED's who's intensity changes with the signal voltage, really makes debugging at a glance easier.

a day ago by bouvin

This, I believe, was something introduced by Expert Sleepers in their Eurorack modules. That was certainly the first place I saw it.

20 hours ago by smusamashah

Is there a similar tool for doing graphics?

2 days ago by grae_QED

>five fewer dollars in your pocket

>fifteen fewer dollars in your pocket

Definitely gave me a chuckle

a day ago by nxpnsv

The most compelling pricing box I have seen so far!

a day ago by bambax

Funny, but incorrect?

Bespoke Plus is $5 and Pro is $15; there should be no check in the $5 line for Pro, OR if both lines are checked, the second line should be $10 and not $15.

As it is it means Pro is $5+$15=$20.

a day ago by Lurkars

It depends a bit on interpretation: if you pay 15, you of course have also 5 fewer in your pocket, so the 5 fewer can be included in the 15 fewer, than it's correct.

a day ago by y4mi

i disagree.

what you propose wouldn't make sense in my opinion, as its basically two consecutive boolean declaration

    $5 less = pocket - paid <= pocket - 5
    $15 less = pocket - paid <= pocket - 15

a day ago by boomlinde

$15 less in the pocket is at least $5 less in the pocket.

a day ago by bambax

Replies and downvotes mark a strong disagreement. So okay, my interpretation is not mainstream, but I still think it's a possible interpretation.

The difference in interpretation comes from the nature of "features": are they actions or verifications? A verification is (usually) idempotent / has no consequence on the state of the world, but an action isn't.

I read the lines as "takes $x from your pocket".

2 days ago by molotovbliss

Avid tracker musician here from days past. ReNoise, is one of the purchased license holders I'm proud to promote. +ReNoise

Also, add this to your list. :-) * https://www.kvraudio.com/product/4klang-by-alcatraz

2 days ago by molotovbliss

http://4klang.untergrund.net/ specific details about 4klang for those curious.

2 days ago by yojo

Reminded me of SunVox: https://warmplace.ru/soft/sunvox/

a day ago by bodge5000

Renoise has been my "daily driver" for a good number of years now, but I'm looking at getting into more modular or programming (like live coding, but without the live bit) stuff as I want to be doing more generative stuff.

Still, can 100% recommend renoise for what it is, and more, and I doubt I'll ever fully stop using it

20 hours ago by schmorptron

what are you using nowadays?

2 days ago by officeplant

Renoise is forever the best bang for my buck I've ever gotten out of a DAW.

2 days ago by _eLRIC

Discovered a few days ago another nice music studio of the same kind that I really liked : Sunvox https://warmplace.ru/soft/sunvox/

I'll have to try Bespoke as well ...

2 days ago by jay-anderson

Sunvox was my first thought as well. Watching the intro video it seems in bespoke the modules' internals are more visible. Though it's missing the sequencer portion compared with sunvox.

2 days ago by tlhunter

Bespoke has some definite SunVox UI vibes going on.

2 days ago by ejarzo

Really well thought out interface, looks super easy to quickly make a bunch of edits -- The SHIFT+Touch to connect modules is nice and I love that you can always just export the last 30 minutes. Looks like a ton of work went into the documentation as well -- can't wait to dive in!

2 days ago by Jenz

Haha this is the most amazing feature matrix I've ever seen.

On a more serious note, modular music is an extremely interesting and growing area and just about every module is surprisingly expensive; I'm curious to how well this translates to virtual racks.

2 days ago by armchairhacker

I've never heard about modular music, but I know must VSTs are extremely expensive. And they're expensive to even seriously try.

I want to get into music production but a barrier is that Omnisphere and FL Studio are $500 and have a super-limited trial version. As a grad student I'm not going to spend $500 for a piece of software I might be interested in using.

I would much rather have it be like software development where almost everything is free. And instead of paying upfront, synths / effects can make money by taking a cut of your revenue (I don't think that's like software development but it means synth producers still make revenue).

2 days ago by strenholme

I used to have a synth buying guide. For people just starting out I would go for:

• Get Reaper. It’s a mainstream DAW, is fully functional, a free download, and only $60 to register after 90 days.

• Valhalla Supermassive for reverb: https://valhalladsp.com/shop/reverb/valhalla-supermassive/

• The VST fork of VCVrack for a modular synth: https://github.com/bsp2/VeeSeeVSTRack#downloads

I would get a keyboard controller with full sized keys and a 5-pin DIN MIDI out for just over $200, but that can come later.

One thing to avoid is the rabbit hole of concentrating on what gear to buy over actually making music with the gear.

2 days ago by PaulDavisThe1st

Valhalla plugins are restricted to Windows or macOS, unless you are willing to use a Windows VST bridge such as yabridge.

No reason to get 5 pin DIN MIDI at this point; almost all devices offer USB MIDI and its as good as DIN MIDI in almost all scenarios.

[ EDIT: VCV Rack ] 2.0 will be out "soonish" which will offer an "official" VST (and if we're lucky, LV2 also) plugin, though at a price.

People's mileage will vary when it comes to the DAW. As the author of another (libre & open source) DAW, I get emails that vary from "Oh my god, I've used X and Y and Z and yours is so much easier to use and incredibly fast and reliable" to "how can you look at yourself in a mirror when you make such shit software". Reaper works for a bunch of people, but not for another bunch, as is the case for most DAWs.

2 days ago by jasondoty

If you're not going to make money off it, my opinion is you can use cracked VSTs without any concerns of "is it right".

In fact, as with a lot of pirated soft/media the experience is superior. Licensing and DRM of music software is a headache - dongles, software centers and other bloat. Scene groups like R2R even optimize performance and patch out bugs in addition to cracking protections, making their releases superior than that of the original developers.

Otherwise have a look at Splice rent-to-own plugin licensing.

2 days ago by fancy_hammer

There are sooooo many VST plugins out there. If you don't see the value in the cost of Omnisphere don't buy it. Look for other options. It's an extremely competitive market.

Ableton Live Suite has a tremendous amount of tools out of the box and contains everything you need to make music with. Look for second hand copies on forums. You'll likely be able to pick a copy up for $400 or so. You could buy that and never buy any software again.

> And instead of paying upfront, synths / effects can make money by taking a cut of your revenue

Hahahaha, have you asked how much the average electronic music producer makes vs the average software dev? ;)

2 days ago by TheOtherHobbes

Omnisphere is the last thing you should buy.

There are countless free VSTs that are very, very good. KVRAudio is a good news source for what's happening in VST World, both paid and free.

https://www.kvraudio.com/

There are also numerous plug-in discount stores (Audio Plugin Deals, Plugin Boutique, Emmett VST Buzz, and others) that regularly sell mainstream VSTs at hugely discounted sale prices.

Free DAWs are harder to find, but you can get intro-level DAWs with enough features to get started for less than $200.

On a Mac Logic Pro is $199, which is a full-featured DAW with a solid collection of virtual instruments.

2 days ago by tomc1985

Second on watching the plugin stores, particularly Plugin Boutique. Some of their sales are nuts, and they even have a very well organized free section.

Ableton Live Lite (1 step up from intro) comes free with a lot of music gear. I had a bunch of licenses lying around because it came with my USB audio box, my MIDI keyboard, etc etc.

Also consider FL Studio. Unlike nearly everyone else it comes with free lifetime updates. Like Ableton, every edition except the cheapest has a ton of plugins to cover nearly every need. My license is almost 20 years old, and I'm still running the latest version. Easily the best money my broke-student ass ever spent.

2 days ago by quantified

Pricing plan you can understand!

2 days ago by 41209

Agreed.

That alone makes me want to donate.

Can it work as a VST plugin ?

2 days ago by yellowapple

If there's a plugin version of this I can see it giving ZynAddSubFx a run for its money in my workflow.

2 days ago by 41209

It's GPL so you can always create your own.

I wouldn't mind feature bounties for a project like this.

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